Las espectaculares imágenes que han convertido a National Geographic en una estrella de Instagram

La revista consigue 20 millones de seguidores y mil millones de 'me gusta' en la red social

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Más de 100 fotoperiodistas gestionan la cuenta de Instagram de National Geographic desde marzo de 2012 cuando se creó. Han publicado más de 7.000 imágenes. Han llegado a los mil millones de corazones (los 'me gusta' de esta red social). Y acaban de superar los 20 millones de seguidores.

Para celebrar estas cifras, la revista ha seleccionado las imágenes que más han gustado a sus seguidores. Triunfan los paisajes y los animales en planos cortos. El premio se lo llevan los pandas, que aparecen en cinco de las 14 fotografías más populares.

Look into these eyes! Stop the demand and the killing can too. There are only 3200 tigers left in the wild! We need to fight for the right of tigers to live - peacefully and without being killed. @stevewinterphoto This image was from my @natgeo story “The Cry of the Tiger" Check out my NG Book “Tigers Forever” - this is the cub on the front cover photographed 10 months later! Join National Geographic's Big Cat Initiative, www.causeanuproar.org #bigcatsforever Check out WildAid - “When the buying stops, the killing can too” #wildaid - Watch the Nat Geo / WildAid PSA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81MKjmsnEgM #bigcatsforever @natgeo @wildaid @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @stevewinterphoto #photooftheday #photography#conservationphotography #love #tigers #cats #beautiful #me #follow #canon #wildaid #ivoryfree #eiainvestigator

Una foto publicada por National Geographic (@natgeo) el

Photograph by @JohnStanmeyer Mount Bromo (foreground) and Mount Semeru, simultaneously erupting as the earliest touches of dawn mix with the light from a setting full moon during the sacred #Kasada ceremony in the spectacular #Tengger Caldera located in #EastJava #Indonesia. Pleased to announce that beginning today I’ve joined @NatGeoCreative for representation in commercial assignments and image licensing. In addition, I’m bringing my entire archive — 14 stories from more than a decade with @NatGeo magazine — over to NatGeo Creative, expanding my collaboration with the Society, sharing more loudly the passions for education, awareness on the issues facing all of us today and into the future. Looking forward to dancing with the talented team lead by Maura Mulvihill and the likes of @alicebrkeating, @ginamartindc and more. Above is a photograph from my 4th story with the magazine, published in the January 2008 edition, titled #VolcanoGods. A story I proposed to the magazine, the approach was rather unorthodox — not how one volcano is interacted with #spiritually, rather how an entire nation located along the #RingofFire interacts with what many Indonesian’s believe are the bellybuttons of the earth. Will never forget the story proposal conference call. It went somewhat like this: Mid-morning in a bar in Iquitos, Peru. On the phone was editor and chief, Chris Johns, then director of photography @dlgriffin, creative director @billmarr, members of the editorial and art departments, maps and more. After explaining the story approach for 10 or so minutes, Chris said, “I like this idea, let’s do it.” Then I thought, great — now I have to prove my theories on a topic never widely studied. Had the privilege to be partner with Senior Photo Editor, @sadiequarrier. Sadie and I worked through the process of creating the final narrative that appeared in the magazine. Often complex, I’ve always feel that each National Geographic story I do is like preparing — then defending — your doctoral thesis. In this case, it nearly was, standing in a room over a year later, presenting the final story that originated with a "let’s do it" back in South America.

Una foto publicada por National Geographic (@natgeo) el

Las imágenes forman parte de encargos de los fotógrafos, pero también publican instantáneas de su vida fuera del trabajo, tienen libertad para compartir lo que consideren. Todos comparten la misma contraseña y han llegado a un acuerdo para no subir al perfil material hasta pasada una hora desde la última actualización, según se explica en un reportaje del instituto estadounidense de periodismo Poynter.

Sarah Leen, directora de fotografía de National Geographic, reconoce que la cuenta de Instagram "probablemente no ayude a la venta de la revista, ni a que la gente visite la web", pero como también recoge esta publicación, contribuye a crear comunidad y a que los fotógrafos puedan publicar imágenes que por una cuestión de espacio no llegan a aparecer en la revista. Además de servir como plataformas para revivir imágenes de un archivo con 125 años de historia de la fotografía.

David Guttenfelder cuenta en el artículo de Poynter que las imágenes que decide compartir en Instagram son las que hace con su móvil durante sus viajes. "Así la gente puede seguirme en el propio terreno".

"Para los que nos ganamos la vida vendiendo fotos, Instagram y publicar gratis en una red social es difícil de asumir", explicó Joel Sartore, uno de los fotógrafos que se acaba de incorporar a esta comunidad. Ha aprendido a interactuar con el público, se ha dado cuenta de cómo internet reforzaba su marca, pero sobre todo, ha aprendido a trabajar en un equipo de comisarios, como él mismo autodefine a sus colegas en Poynter. "Hemos creado una galería digital donde no hacemos autopromoción, sino que ponemos por delante el interés de la revista y la gente, preocupándonos por compartir un contenido de calidad".

Photo @coryrichards on assignment with @intotheokavango for @natgeo A woman who lost her leg to a land mine working her crops nine months ago makes her way down a dusty road in Angola. In 2002, Angola emerged from decades of civil war. Since then, the country has made massive strides in making a name for themselves in global markets. @halotrust has been working tirelessly in the years following the ceasefire to clear the rural areas of land mines. In an odd twist, the de-mining taking place is opening up land that was once de facto 'off limits'. As areas are opened, people move in, and ecosystems are interrupted and altered. It's a catch 22. Our #okavango15 expedition is traveling by Mekoro from the spring that is the source of the Cuito River in the Angolan highlands, southward over 1,000 miles to do a scientific survey of one of the most pivotal tributaries of the Okavango River Delta. Follow @coryrichards and @intotheokavango for more images and stories from the next ten weeks in Africa. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative @eddiebauer www.intotheokavango.org posted from the field.

Una foto publicada por National Geographic (@natgeo) el

Photo by @amivitale. Rangers from @lewa_wildlife move a sleepy black rhino from its transport caravan to its new home at @nrt_kenya’s Sera Community Conservancy. It’s a habitat the rhino has not seen in nearly 30 years. Populations of the Eastern black rhino plummeted by 98% between 1960 and 1995 primarily as a result of poaching and hunting, according to the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. Conservation efforts have stabilized and increased numbers in most of the black rhino’s former ranges since then. Kenya’s population is projected to rise significantly in the near future, especially with growing partnerships between government, communities and conservation organizations. It is hoped that the new rhino sanctuary will benefit Kenya’s black rhino population. #savetherhinos #natureisspeaking #rhinos #nature #wild #wildlife #conservation #animals #endangered #endangeredspecies #naturelovers #lewa #lewawildlifeconservancy #Kenya #magicalkenya #Africa #NikonNoFilter #nikon #nikonambassador #amivitale #photojournalism #onassignment @nature_africa @natgeocreative @thephotosociety @nikonusa

Una foto publicada por National Geographic (@natgeo) el

The time for Mt. Lion research is now. From projects pictured here in the south led by researchers like Mark Elbroch and Panthera to projects in the northern range of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem led by Dan Stahler, researchers use winter months as the prime time for tracking and locating one of North Americas most elusive predators. In this case researchers are excited to find newborn kittens at the site of a suspected den. Once checked to determine sex, weight and overall health the kittens are returned to their den, researchers armed with knowledge that will help establish population estimates in a given area. To see the flip side of that cute cuddly face, go to @drewtrush To learn more about ongoing projects in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem that hope to learn more about these amazing animals follow the @yellowstone_cougar_project and visit panthera.org #mtlionsrule #kittens #cats #wildlife #greateryellowstoneecosystem #gye

Una foto publicada por National Geographic (@natgeo) el

El 70% de los seguidores de esta cuenta procede de fuera de Estados Unidos y un 75% del total pertenecen a la generación millenial, según datos de la publicación. "Hemos llegado a una nueva audiencia, mucho más joven, gracias a Instagram", declaró Leen.

* También puedes seguirnos en Instagram y Flipboard. ¡No te pierdas lo mejor de Verne!

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